Coral Springs Museum of Art to Host Complimentary Artist Reception featuring Jill Krutick and Hubert Phipps


Published on February 18, 2019

The Coral Springs Museum of Art will unveil two new exhibits at a complimentary artist reception on Thursday, March 21, 2019 at 6 p.m. at the Museum (2855A Coral Springs Drive, Coral Springs, Florida 33065). The Main Gallery will feature abstract expressionist Jill Krutick, curated by Bruce Helander, and the East and Kuhn Galleries will highlight the works of sculptor Hubert Phipps. Guests will enjoy complimentary hors d’oeuvres and refreshments.

“Making art, and the artists who create it, accessible to everyone in the community is at the core of all that we do,” said Julia Andrews, Executive Director of the Coral Springs Museum of Art. “The works created by our featured artists is thought-provoking and interesting and we hope the entire community will join us for this upcoming reception.”

Jill Krutick and Hubert Phipps’ exhibits will be on display from March 16, 2019 through May 18, 2019.

Jill Krutick – “Lyrical Abstraction”
Artist Jill Krutick incorporates oils, acrylics, colors and textural components into her paintings, offering viewers a brand of artistic poetry that is instantly recognizable as Krutick’s signature. With a rhythmic swirl, Krutick’s distinctive style is based on abstract expressionism, which is most notably seen in the early works of New York School members Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. Krutick’s abstraction is also inspired by female artists Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner, which allows her to explore the creative aspects of color, texture and rhythmic swirls.

Krutick’s exhibition is curated by artist and critic Bruce Helander, featuring over thirty large-scale canvases that highlight contemporary abstraction, accented colors and compelling depths and surfaces.

Hubert Phipps – “Journey Continued”
For artist and sculptor Hubert Phipps, the most powerful art is the art that connects within you before you begin to analyze art through thought. Phipps’ work relies on “experiencing the realm of the abstract mind in an inmate way” and transferring that vision into a physical form, whether it is captured through paper, on canvas, or in a 3D format. Oftentimes in Phipps’ works, as he develops a drawing from scratch, he strives to create an aesthetic and abstract balance.